Monthly Archives: January 2011

Tunisia is Everywhere

Workers, the unemployed, and oppressed classes have taken to the streets across North Africa and the Mediterranean. The world economic crisis has brought about a period of deep austerity and exploitation to the already struggling peoples of North Africa and the Mediterranean. The struggle of the Tunisian insurrection against US-backed Ben Ali autocracy has led to a sense of possibility that has inspired workers and the oppressed classes to rise up against the ruling interests of the region. Yemen, Egypt, Jordan, Tunisia, and Algeria find themselves gripped in battle against vested interests that have wrecked the lives and economies of their nations. They join the global fight against this crisis alongside workers in Europe, Asia, and the Americas.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Toward Theory of Political Organization for Our Time Part III: nature of our period

S. Nappalos

The Nature of Our Period: looking to an autonomous working class alternative

The end of the twentieth century was a time of transition. The regime of low-intensity warfare, the dismantling of the welfare state, and neo-liberal privatization schemes ultimately was running its course[1]. The final defeats were to be dolled out across the world in the eventual collapse of finance bubbles, widespread resistance to austerity, and the implosive of the economies of Latin America[2]. Before this was all but said and done, there was the gradual and later meteoric rise and fall of social movements against neo-liberal reforms and the militarism leading to the afghan and Iraq wars. Revolutionaries played an active and disproportionate role in mobilizing the social actors in what would become the largest mobilizations of their kind. Continue reading

Towards Theory of Political Organization for Our Time Part II: we are not platformists, we strive to be

S. Nappalos

In recent times a number of ideological currents from the libertarian communist tradition have inspired a generation to organize, build and reproduce organizations, and struggle around a rethinking of their traditions and future. Much of this theory comes from the period of the greatest waves of proletarian and peasant struggles in the 20th century. That period produced theory of organization based on the protagonists’ position within high points of struggle, its successes and failures. Continue reading

Towards Theory of Political Organization for Our Time Part I: trajectories of struggle, the intermediate level, and political rapprochement

S. Nappalos

Political organization is a collective answer to common problems. People organize based on a collective sense of need, and the perspectives and problems encountered in social groups crystallize into organizational forms and moments. This is a general historical trend; even without a theory, organization emerges to meet concrete needs that cannot be solved except by building social forms to address them.

Continue reading